Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Terminal 1.5

© LAWA
© LAWA
© LAWA

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Terminal 1.5 Wins the ACEC California Honor Award! 

Ninyo & Moore provided geotechnical engineering for the design and construction of the new $490M LAX Terminal 1.5, which has a footprint of approximately 52,000 square feet and consists of a five-story structure, including four above-grade levels and one basement level. The new structure connects Terminals 1 and 2, which were previously separated by an open-space area.  The reason for this open space is the City of Los Angeles Central Outfall Sewer (COS), an underground brick-and-mortar sewer pipeline constructed in the late 1930’s, passes through this area.  When Terminal 1 was originally constructed in 1984 – in preparation for the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles – it was decided to design the terminal as an independent and isolated terminal from the rest of the terminals at LAX.  Now, as Los Angeles prepares to host the 2028 Olympic Games, there are many improvements at LAX, including the Landside Access Modernization Program (LAMP).  The LAMP provides improved passenger access and movement to and through LAX.  To take advantage of the LAMP improvements, it was imperative that Terminals 1 and 2 be connected.  Terminal 1.5 is a critical component to the preparation of the 2028 Olympic Games.  In addition to connecting the two terminals, Terminal 1.5 also provides additional space for federal security requirements, and provides an uninterrupted link between the ticketing and baggage claim lobbies of both Terminals 1 and 2, which provides operational flexibility and efficiency for the airport and airlines. The multi-tenant building includes baggage claim, ticketing, security checkpoint, airside connector, retail concessions, and leasable office space. Also included is a bus gate, outbound baggage system (including CBIS), and inbound baggage system. The project also includes a vertical circulation core, which provides connectivity between the terminal and the future Automated People Mover (AMP), which is a key component of the LAMP.  The new structure is supported by a combination of shallow and deep foundations consisting of a combination of over 300 concrete cast-in-drilled hole (CIDH) and torque down piles. Piles adjacent to the COS were deepened and constructed with steel sleeves around their upper portions to transfer new building loads beneath the COS. Zero lot line construction required special attention during design, and underpinning of portions of the existing structures, to see that new building loads and construction would not impact existing terminal buildings.

 

 

 

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